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Good Nutrition is Good Medicine

Chapter 1 - Protein

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 16, 2010

Proteins are complex molecules made up of individual building blocks called amino acids. While these individual subcomponents have powerful health effects as individual molecules, there is no nutritional substance more important than those that emerge from stringing those amino acids together and forming proteins. 

The word protein is derived from Latin where it refers to primary importance. There are anywhere from 50-200,000 different proteins in the body, which vary basedon their amino acid sequence, and this enormous number gives the protein structure it’s mind-boggling versatility. 75-80% of the dry weight of the body is protein and this includes enzymes, hormones, neurotransmitters, muscle, bone, teeth and tissue. All of the proteins of the body are custom designed for individual needs and built up from smaller building-block components called amino acids.

Proteins are synthesized originally from plants utilizing carbon, hydrogen and oxygen which are ubiquitous and nitrogen which must be extracted from the soils or from so called nitrogen-fixing bacteria which attach themselves to roots and do the extracting work for the plant. Animals then obtain their protein by eating plants or other animals. When the animal expires, the nitrogen from the proteins return to the earth where it is recycled into further protein production. In addition, one of the primary roles of dietary protein is to supply the body with nitrogen.

All foods can be thought of as being comprised of two categories of substance.  Macronutrient (protein, fats and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals and trace elements).  Micronutrients serve to support utilization of macronutrients.  And macronutrient's main function is to help to produce the most critical substance in the body…protein!   That’s right, as critical as fats and carbohydrates are, their main role is to stimulate the production of proteins.  As we live and age our body is constantly breaking down.  Fortunately, when we are thriving, this break down initiates a building up process and the life force that is responsible for this process is mediated by protein.  The secret of health and “young-gevity”  is  to make sure that there are enough protein building blocks present  to  allow the formation of more cells and tissue as old cells and tissue die off.  While some protein building blocks can be manufactured, many cannot.  Thus the importance of generous and strategic ingestion of dietary  protein.

When it comes to dietary protein, the most important thing to recognize is that not all dietary proteins are equally valuable.  The measurement of protein value is referred to as “biological value” or BV and is measured on a scale of 1-100.  The biological value of a given protein is based on the relationship between protein consumed and protein excreted.  This gives an indication of how much consumed protein actually remains within the body to do work.

The so called  “BV scale” features eggs as a perfect 100 with beef protein around 80, soy around 70 and wheat around 50.  But the standout protein based on biological value is whey protein which scores a 104; it’s literally off the charts.  And whey protein isolates, which are processed to reduce fats and lactose (as well as, unfortunately,  many of the health-supporting, bioactive  compounds found in the concentrated form) score an incredible 154!  And whey protein is not only important because of it’s biological value.

Proteins are large molecules that are composed of smaller biding blocks called amino acids. Typically those composed of smaller groups of amino acids are called peptides 2-9 amino acids) and larger combinations (1-2000 amino acids long) are referred to as polypeptide or proteins. The link between amino acids is referred to as a peptide bond. The bulk of the human body (after water is removed) is composed of protein. There are subdivided into two types: fibrous and globular.

Fibrous proteins are elongated and insoluble in water. They play a structural and supportive role and are also involved in movement. The human body is held together by the action of fibrous proteins of collagen is the prototype (the precursor “colla-“ is Latin for glue) which is the most abundant protein in the human body, (almost 25% of the human body’s protein is collagen) , and possibly the most abundant protein on earth. There are at least 20 different types of human collagen similar in structure but different in distribution. In skin and connective tissue, collagen is found with a fibrous protein called elastin which as its name implies, has a highly elastic nature ( an elastin fiber can stretch 5 times as much as a rubber band!). When combined with the rigid nature of collagen the resulting networked matrix can provide strong support and resistance with flexible contractility. Collagen also forms about 1/3 of bone, where in combination with minerals like calcium, magnesium and zinc it forms a powerfully resilient composite capable of mild flexibility and distortion.

A good rule of thumb for daily protein requirements is about ½ to 1 gram per pound of body weight.  If you’re healing or exercising or under unusual stress you need more.  Women  who are pregnant also have higher protein requirements.  You will find yourself craving sweets when you need more protein.   The next time you have a hankering for a candy bar or a glass of apple juice, try some dense protein (eggs or powdered whey protein, for example) instead.  When you’ve ingested enough protein, your sweet craving will disappear.  Just think about how often you crave sweets on a typical day, and that should give you an idea of how much daily protein your body is required!  

The best way to meet your protein need on a daily basis is smoothies.  Try mixing protein powder with ice cold distilled water and essential fatty acids (more on EFAs later).  Crack a raw egg in and add a couple of frozen organic strawberries.  If you want to more sweetener try xylitol or stevia.  Cocoa powder will make it chocolaty and vanilla extract will spike the chocolate flavor.  The smoothie format is filling and easy to prepare.  And it allows you to get a high concentration of protein. (30-40 grams easily).

 

  

 The best time to take your protein supplement (or ideally, smoothie) is after working out.  The body is “’primed” for the absorption of all nutrients after it’s been stimulated, and this is especially true of proteins.  Later, when we talk about amino acids, we will discover that this priming function is especially significant with these protein building blocks.  The next best time is bedtime.  This will allow for more effective tissue regeneration and healing as well as improved hormonal production, all of which occur at night.  The third best time is at breakfast , as pm healing and growth can cause nutrient depletion.  Of course, during the day protein supplementation can help stave off munchies and/or the tendency to snack on sweets.  Remember, protein requirements are often disguised as sweet cravings. 

Proteins are large molecules that are composed of smaller biding blocks called amino acids. Typically those composed of smaller groups of amino acids are called peptides 2-9 amino acids) and larger combinations (1-2000 amino acids long) are referred to as polypeptide or proteins. The link between amino acids is referred to as a peptide bond. The bulk of the human body (after water is removed) is composed of protein. There are subdivided into two types: fibrous and globular.

Fibrous proteins are elongated and insoluble in water. They play a structural and supportive role and are also involved in movement. The human body is held together by the action of fibrous proteins of collagen is the prototype (the precursor “colla-“ is Latin for glue) which is the most abundant protein in the human body, (almost 25% of the human body’s protein is collagen) , and possibly the most abundant protein on earth. There are at least 20 different types of human collagen similar in structure but different in distribution. In skin and connective tissue, collagen is found with a fibrous protein called elastin which as its name implies, has a highly elastic nature ( an elastin fiber can stretch 5 times as much as a rubber band!). When combined with the rigid nature of collagen the resulting networked matrix can provide strong support and resistance with flexible contractility. Collagen also forms about 1/3 of bone, where in combination with minerals like calcium, magnesium and zinc it forms a powerfully resilient composite capable of mild flexibility and distortion.

 

Perhaps due to the popularity, as well as the glut of products in the health food marketplace, their seems to be some confusion around some whey supplements.  To clarify, whey protein is a blend of globular proteins derived from whey, which is in turn a by-product milk that is leftover from cheese production. There are three main types of whey protein supplements: whey protein concentrate which has the highest concentration of non-protein bioactive compounds (more on these substances later) whey protein isolate, which has been processed (via microfiltration or “ion exchange”) to remove fats and lactose but contains over 90% protein and whey protein hydrolysate, which has been partially digested for ease of absorbtion.  The isolate and hydrolysate forms may be easier to use if allergies or digestive issues are a factor.  For most folks whey protein concentrates, which are the least processed, serve as an effective protein source and the additional benefits of non protein bioactive compounds that support the immune system and act as natural ant-biotics as well as a significantly lower cost are a plus.  Also, whenever it comes to proteins (and food in general) less processing is usually better.  Look for new Zealand whey as this enlightened country has a great respect for dairy products and minimezes (or avoids) the use of hormones and anti-biotics.

 

Now while proteins come in over 100,000 forms they are all built up from around 20 components called amino acids.  You can think of amino acids like beads on a string and the proteins as the final necklace.  The functionality of the protein necklace depends upon its amino acid beads. The term amino refers to the ammonium molecule which can be found somewhere in an amino acid and the acid refers to the portion of the amino acid that is (logically) acidic.  According to Eric Braverman, who has written extensively on amino acids, when the when the acidic portion is removed the remaining amine can function as a messenger in the nervous system, and when the amine portion is removed, the remaining acid can be used in numerous biochemical processes including detoxification and energy production.

 

The 8 Chapters of Good Nutrition

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 12, 2010

Ok, so there really isn't a "book" called  The 8 Chapters of Good Nutrition; it's simply a handy way to think about diet and supplementation.  Niutrition as we've said is a vast subject matter and to make it palatable we've divided it into 8 (somewhat) manageable sections.  I say "somewhat" because even with chunking we're still going to have to absorb a large amount of information.  While that may seem daunting, it's actually good news, because it means that there's lots of places where we can begin to improve the state of our nutritional staus and thus ultimately our overall sense of physical well-being.    So, without further ado: The 8 Chapters of Good Nutrition, Chapter 1, Protein...

 

On Good Nutrition

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 12, 2010

 

The power of nutrition to build and regenerate body organs and systems is unfathomable and the degree of non-toxicity and gentleness is astounding as opposed to inelegant and grossly toxic medical technology of drugs.


The human body is made up of a hundred trillion cells.  Your body makes cells like we bake cake.  It requires a recipe. But instead of, eggs and butter and whole grain flour it needs vitamins and minerals and essential fatty acids. Now, if you used elmer’s glue instead of flour and battery acid instead of eggs you wouldn’t have much of a cake and if your body has to use fried fats and refined sugar to make cells it’s not gonna have much of a body and eventually it’s gonna begin to decay and degenerate.  one needs to look no further than your average public gathering place (try an all-u-can-eat buffet)to witness these effects.


Cells are perfectly capable of living and thriving and reproducing regenerating and healing and doing they’re specialized functions as long as they receive the appropriate vitamins, minerals, fats, proteins, accesory nutrients and generous quantities of good clean water.  That means from a physical perspective, no one needs to be "sick" now, the topic of good nutrition can be divided into two categories: diet and supplements.  "Diet" referring to  foodstuffs and "supplementation" referring to nutrients that add to (supplement) the diet.  both subjects are important to understand for maximum health benefits.


The foods we eat have a tremendous impact on our physical health and well being.  To put it simply, the less calories we ingest, the better off we will be. We should attempt to ingest the most nutrient dense foods.  that is foods with a high nutrient to calorie ratio (lots of nutrition, not so many calories).  The bulk of food calories should come from vegetables of all kinds (especially green leafies, grasses and avocados which are good sources of fats), quality protein, such as eggs, some fish and nuts and (ideally, sprouted) seeds.   Water should be distilled or reverse osmosis and should be ingested copiously (1/2 to 1 gallon a day, under ideal conditions).


Then, there is nutritional supplementation.  While herbs like saw palmetto and st. john's wort may have their place in a health care regimen, they should not be considered nutritional supplements. herbs are medicines and not nutrition.  nutritional supplementation is a vast subject and thus the importance of the "eight chapters of good nutrition'  which can be thought of as a simplified version of the this encyclopedic and potentially overwhelming subject.


 

My Favorites

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 12, 2010
BEYOND TANGY TANGERINE

REBOUND FX

EFA PLUS

ULTIMATE CLASSIC

These are some of my favorite Youngevity products. Enjoy the results!

The Triune Brain

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 7, 2010

One powerful way to look at our lives and experiences, is to divide our the input channels into our brains into 3 parts (the so-called triune brain model proposed by Paul MacLean).  The lowest (oldest) channel termed reptilian  immersed in the fight or flight aspects of survival, the  mammalian "limbic system" associated with emotions, pleasure and pain. And the highest most recently developed portion called the neo (new)cortex.  The trick to being effective and successful in life is to maximize top down input from the neocortex to the limbic system and restricting "limbic hijacking" i.e bottom up input  from what are not truly life-threatening situations.

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Welcome to the Bright Side

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 7, 2010


I am a nutritional pharmacist from Boulder Colorado. I specialize in using nutritional supplements where other healthcare practitioners use toxic pharmaceutical drugs. That’s because I look at the human body as a healing and regenerating system, designed divinely to heal and renew itself on a moment to moment basis. But it needs the raw materials to do its work. The raw materials we call nutrition and nutritional supplementation. You’ve gotta be on a nutritional supplement program if you want to be healthy in 21st century America. If you are on prescription drugs, we want to help you get off those drugs and get on a good nutritional supplement program, like the one designed by Dr. Wallach. They’re the ones I take and the ones I recommend, and if you follow the information on this site we’ll point you in the same direction: towards a cleaner, chemical-free healthy existence. If you should have any questions, please do not hesitate to post them or call me on the air every Friday from 2:00 - 4:00 pm. on 1080 am KSCO Radio.


 

Dead Doctors Don't Lie 03-27

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 7, 2010

 

Pharmacist Ben on Vitamin B

 

Welcome

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By Pharmacist Ben · March 7, 2010



Why take dangerous drugs when all your body needs to stay healthy is all natural with no side effects?

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